Gaming

Final Fantasy 14's next big patch gives everyone their own idyllic island

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A recent Final Fantasy 14 Letter from the Producer has given us some details on the long awaited Island Sanctuary mode, and more, coming in the next big update.

The next big patch for everyone’s favourite MMO, patch 6.2, is set to launch late August, and will bring in a bunch of new content. Including the highly-anticipated Island Sanctuary, which will give every player their own personal island to relax on.

“Players will be able to build their own personal island sanctuary in this relaxing solo content,” reads a press release. “Gather materials, build facilities, care for creatures, and more, without the need for previous crafting or gathering experience.”

There’s also a unique island currency that players can earn from “completing various content”, which can in turn be exchanged for “special items,” whatever those might be.

Of course, there’s a whole lot more coming with patch 6.2. There will be new main scenario quests, picking up where the grand adventure left off in the last main patch. More side quests too, which will further Tataru’s Grand Endeavor.

A new dungeon is coming – called The Fell Court of Troia – as well as a new trial, which will be detailed later. And there’s a new eight player raid, Pandæmonium.

Some main scenario reworks are coming to, with the duty support feature expanding to include main scenario dungeons from Snow Cloak up to The Vault.

However, there will be one patch before that one drops, patch 6.18, which is out tomorrow (July 5). This patch will bring in the data centre travel feature, meaning players will then be able to visit worlds on different data centres.

FF14 producer Naoki Yoshida obviously has his hands full at the moment with the continued work on the hit MMO, but he still somehow has time to get Final Fantasy 16 moving at a good pace. FF16 will be out some time in summer 2023, but it is completely playable, with only polish preventing it from actually releasing.

Cameron

Cameron has worked in IT for nearly a decade, including four years spent repairing and servicing computers for Microsoft. He’s also a smarthome enthusiast who built his own smart mirror with just a frame, some electronics, a Raspberry Pi, and open-source code.

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